Networking: crucial for making a place for yourself in a new culture!

Here I am networking with German AELI students in Bamberg, in 1995. They were part of our "American English Language Immersion Program in the United States. 
One thing my own career has shown me, again and again--if you don't get a job, university place or other competitive position you apply for, write a respectful letter to the person who informed you of your non-selection and ask why you were not chosen. 
Then ask how you can make your credentials stronger to apply again at a future date. Sometimes you'll get no response, but other times your added effort will put you at the top of the alternates list, and maybe get you a second chance if the preferred candidate backs out. 
If you can make a call on the phone the person who rejected you, that's even better. Just be sure you don't communicate anger or hostility. 
Instead, communicate humility and a sincere desire to make changes that will make you a better candidate. 
I have gotten several jobs by doing this, as well as referrals for other, similar jobs. 
This is called networking--making friends in your desired profession. Naturally you will do the same for others.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Top Three mistakes for students of English, with Czech examples

writing a 5-paragraph essay