Posts

Showing posts from January, 2011

Communication is key!

Image
Life in the USA is fast, competitive and ever-changing. Communication must be equally quick and effective. Tweets, text messages, wifi, emails that work all the time, concise phone messages, and other electronic communication tools are absolutely necessary for daily life in the USA.

Good habits of effective communication include the following:
1. Take the initiative. Don't wait for people to get in touch with you--they might not!
2. Double-check and confirm all appointments. Just because you know that you've scheduled a meeting doesn't mean that the other person will remember it correctly. Things change, and new events can crowd out plans made yesterday.
3. Be in touch if you'll be late or need to change a plan. If you're more than 10 minutes late, you need to phone/text or email the other person.
4. Check your email/telephone messages frequently, and reply to other people's confirmations and new plans.
5. Always imagine what might go wrong, or be misunderstood…

Spring 2011 Schedule for 12 WEEKS: AMERICAN UNIVERSITY ADMISSION PROCESS; TOEFL, SAT, & GMAT PREP PRACTICE

Here is the schedule for this course, for Spring 2011 in Prague:

1. Saturday, January 22, 11am-12:30 pm
2. Saturday, January 29, 11 am-12:30 pm
3. Saturday, February 5, 11 am-12:30 pm4. Saturday, February12, 11 am-12:30 pm5. Saturday, February 19, 11 am-12:30 pm6. Saturday, February 26, 11 am-12:30 pm
7. Saturday, March 5, 11 am-12:30 pm8. Saturday, March 12, 11 am-12:30 pm9. Saturday, March 19, 11 am-12:30 pm10. Saturday, March 26, 11 am-12:30 pm11. Saturday, April 2, 11 am-12:30 pm12. Saturday, April 9, 11 am-12:30 pm
Cost of course is
5460 KORUNA [455 PER LESSON] (TRANSPORTATION SUPPLEMENT (if I come to your home) IS 600 KORUNA)
TOTAL=6060 KORUNA

Please call Sara Tusek at 731-150-780 for more details.

What American university admissions officers look for in successful applicants

Most good American universities have many, many more applicants than they have openings for new students. To sort out these applicants, three main parts of the application are examined very carefully:

1. Standardized tests. These are timed, objective tests that require test-takers to choose among 4-6 answers to written questions. The answers are scored by computer (credit is added for right answers and subtracted for wrong answers on most tests, to discourage guessing). This produces a number, which is easy to use to compare applicants. Some tests, such as the SAT, also have an essay section, which is subjective and must be read by a scorer, who then gives it a number.

2. Grade point average (GPA): this number is the average of the grades you received in secondary school. There are many ways to weight (change the value given) the GPA, giving more value to harder courses and leaving some classes out, if the university is not interested in those grades. Art, religion, physical education…